7 Reasons to Implement Stay Interviews in Your Organization

What is a stay interview?  “A stay interview is a structured discussion a leader conducts with an individual employee to learn specific actions the leader can take strengthen the employee’s engagement and retention with the organization.”[i]  What is the value of the stay interview?  The organization hears directly from the employee in a one-on-one discussion (not related to performance), with any issues, concerns and opportunities leadership improvement.  This provides us as leaders the opportunity to engage, communicate and retain the workforce.  The stay interviews should be conducted by the leader of the organization, with HR’s support.  I have used effectively used stay interviews.

Below are the thoughts on implementing stay interviews:

  1. Start at the Top: The leader at the top of the organization should set the tone for the organization and conduct stay interviews with their direct reports.  The process should cascade down throughout the rest of the organization to front-line supervisors and employees.  Employees at every level should take part in a stay interview, to ensure an effective and successful process.
  1. In Person: Stay interviews should not be conducted over the phone or via a video conferencing system, if possible. Remote workers should have the opportunity to sit one-on-one with their supervisor and have a discussion.
  1. Expectations of the Stay Interview: Ensure the employee understands the reason for the stay interview and how these interviews will focus on area’s that the manager can influence.  Not all of us can change company policy, mission statements and strategic goals.  However, if a trend in these interviews is consistent, we might have more say in strategic objectives.
  1. Schedule Time: “Most stay interviews take 20 minutes or less to conduct, but some will carry on longer. Leaders should consider telling employees to allow 20 minutes for their meeting, but even then, leaders should allow thirty minutes on their calendars.”[ii] Treat the employee as you want to be treated during the stay interview.
  1. Leave Performance Out of It: There is a time and place to discuss performance expectations. Stay interviews should remain focused on engagement, retention feedback, communication and concerns.  Scripted open ended questions are necessary.
  1. No Advanced Questions: This can limit the conversation to a list of memorized demands and responses. Open ended discussion with note taking, listening and probing for additional information will add tremendous value to the stay interview.
  1. Opening Script: The pre-drafted script is a great way to open the meeting. This will provide additional information to the employee on what the process will look like and the direction of the interview.  The messages will be consistent throughout the organization.

The Why of Stay Interviews:

  • “Employees hear directly from their supervisor that they care and want them to stay and grow with the company.
  • Supervisors further accept retention and engagement within their sphere of responsibility.
  • Employees are more likely to accept responsibility for staying.
  • Stay interviews build trust.”[iii]

Stay Interview Draft Template:

To open the stay interview, a manager may use the following (or similar) statements:

  • I would like to talk with you about the reasons you stay with ____, so I understand what I might be able to do to make this a great place to work.
  • I’d like to have an informal talk with you to find out how the job is going, how the job will change, so I can do my best to support you as your manager, particularly with issues within my control.
  • I will be taking notes throughout our discussion and might ask you to repeat yourself if I do not capture everything.
  • Do you have any questions before we get started?

Review Job Description and Changing Expectations

  • These are the current changes to the job description
  • These will be the changes to the position and current expectations/accountabilities
  • Discuss the reporting structure
  • Communication expectations
  • System reporting expectations
  • Do you have any questions or concerns?

Questions

The following are questions you may ask during a stay interview. You should have several open-ended questions on hand. It’s important to listen and gather ideas from the employee about how you and your organization can retain him or her.

  • Tell me specifically, what factors cause you to enjoy your current job and work situation (including people, job, rewards, job content, coworkers, management etc.), and as a result, they contribute to your staying at our firm as long as you have?
  • What gets your excited to come to work here every day?
  • What do you look forward to when you come to work each day?
  • What do you like most or least about working here?
  • What keeps you working here?
  • If you could change something about your job, what would that be?
  • What would make your job more satisfying?
  • How do you like to be recognized?
  • What talents are not being used in your current role?
  • What would you like to learn here?
  • What motivates (or demotivates) you?
  • What can I do to best support you?
  • What can I do more of or less of as your manager?
  • What can we be doing differently as a management team?  Communication, meetings, etc.
  •  If you “managed yourself,” what would you do differently (in relation to managing “you”), that I, as your current manager, don’t currently do?
  • What might tempt you to leave?

Below are the links for upcoming training’s both in person and online webinars:

Upcoming Compliance Key Trainings

Elmira College: SHRM Certification Exam Prep Course- Fall 2018 & Spring 2019

Upcoming Compliance Online Training

Compliance IQ Webinar

– Matthew Burr, HR Consultant

[i] https://www.shrm.org/resourcesandtools/hr-topics/employee-relations/pages/stay-interview-how-to-core-features-and-advantages.aspx

[ii] https://www.shrm.org/resourcesandtools/hr-topics/employee-relations/pages/stay-interview-how-to-core-features-and-advantages.aspx

[iii] https://www.shrm.org/resourcesandtools/hr-topics/employee-relations/pages/stay-interview-how-to-core-features-and-advantages.aspx

3 Thoughts on What Should and Should Not Be Included in the Personnel Files

In a March 2015 article written by the Society of Human Resource Management, the article provided guidance on separating employee files for relevancy and confidentiality.  Employee records can be separated into three types of files.  “A general personnel file, a confidential employee file and a common file.”[i]  Organizations should always consider and be aware of sensitive information (date of birth, marital status, Social Security numbers, HIPAA protected information, criminal history, court orders, financial history, etc.), that can be included in any of the three separated files.  Other considerations should include relevancy to the supervisor or management of the workforce.  “Is it related to the employee’s performance, knowledge skills, abilities or behavior?”[ii]  This should also be a determining factor, when separating information and organizing new files.  Does the supervisor or manager need access to all the information?

The Basic Personnel File (supervisor and manager relevant):

  • Recruiting information, resumes, job application and academic transcripts
  • Job descriptions (signed)
  • Job offer, promotion, rates of pay, compensation information, training records
  • Handbook and policy acknowledgements (including revised policies)
  • Recognition
  • Disciplinary information, warnings, coaching and counseling
  • Performance evaluations
  • Termination records, exit interview, closure of the file (goes without writing)

The Confidential Personnel File:

  • EEO records
  • Reference and background checks
  • Drug test results
  • Medical and insurance records
  • Child support and garnishments
  • Legal documents
  • Workers compensation and short-term disability claims
  • Investigation notes
  • Form I-9*

The Common File:

  • Form I-9 Audits
  • Form I-9’s* (my recommendation is to put active employee’s I-9’s in a binder that is accessible, confidential and locked in a cabinet, for auditing and reviews).

Regardless of the filing process(s) your organization has implemented, the information contained in any of the employee files needs to be kept confidential and locked in secure filing cabinets.  During trainings with supervisors and managers, my statement is simple, treat your employee’s information as it is your own confidential information.  The last thing we want is open personnel files on desks, doctor’s notes attached to calendars and unlocked filing cabinets.  When an employee exits the organization, I consolidate all files and information into one folder and store in a terminated employee file section, with the exit interview (if applicable).  “Maintaining records in separate files as discussed above allows managers, employees and outside auditors to see the information they need to make decisions, yet does not allow inappropriate access.”[iii]  Filing and organizing paperwork is not always fun, but it is necessary to ensure legality and confidentiality.  If you are confused on employee files and appropriate storage, seek guidance.  Electronic files and legal requirements related to electronic filing can vary by state, a thorough understanding of these laws is necessary prior to implementing an electronic filing system.  We should be proactive and take all precautions, related to employee records and record retention.

[iv]

[i] https://www.shrm.org/resourcesandtools/tools-and-samples/hr-qa/pages/includedinpersonnelfile.aspx

[ii] https://www.shrm.org/resourcesandtools/tools-and-samples/hr-qa/pages/includedinpersonnelfile.aspx

[iii] https://www.shrm.org/resourcesandtools/tools-and-samples/hr-qa/pages/includedinpersonnelfile.aspx

[iv] http://cyquesthr.com/access-personnel-files-laws-50-states/

4 New Hire Forms Needed in New York State

As we have now entered the second month in 2018, some of our organizations will be hiring new employees for continued operation and some for the upcoming seasonal summer months.  Hiring new employees into the workforce is great, we have a tremendous opportunity to set the new hire up for success with a great onboarding process and introduction to the organization.  With new hires, comes legal paperwork.  State and federal forms get updated and posted on government websites for all of us to use.  As leaders and business owners, we need to ensure our forms are updated and legal.

Below are the new hire forms needed in New York State:

  1. Form I-9, Eligibility to work in the United States: This form is required in every state for new hires and needs to be reviewed for expired ID’s; driver’s license, passport, etc. Organizations must verify that each new employee is legally eligible to work in the United States.  Ensure the form is filled out correctly and signed by the right person in the organization.  This form changed in late 2017.
  2. Form W-4, wage Withholding Allowance Certificate: This form is necessary for federal withholdings. All employees should complete and sign a Form W-4 prior to starting work.  Currently, the 2017 form is still being used.  Watch for any updates or changes in 2018, related to the new tax legislation.
  3. Form IT-2104, Employer Allowance Certificate (NYS): This is the New York State withholding form required to be completed in full prior to an employee starts working for the organization. Ensure you are using the 2018 version of the form.
  4. Wage Forms Required by New York Labor Laws: Organizations are required to provide wage notification forms to all employees. The forms vary by hourly, salary, salaried nonexempt, etc.  The link above provides a definition on which form to use based on the classification of the employee.  Reminder, these forms were updated in 2017 as well.

These are the legally required forms that employees are required to complete prior to starting work (I-9 the first three working days).  Other forms will vary by organization; direct deposit, safety rules and regulations, handbooks and policies, IT and login information, safety and security, vehicle registration, cellphone policy, tour of the facility, labor and employment posters, payroll deductions, payroll processing, etc.  Remember, state forms will vary.  Pennsylvania uses a different withholding form from that used in New York.  Consultants should be providing a signed an updated (revised 11.2017) federal Form W-9.

Develop a checklist for your organization to ensure we consistently cover information for all new hires.  The onboarding process is an important part of the employment relationship and many people will decide during this process how long they will potentially stay with an organization.  As leaders, we need to ensure all employees feel welcome and engaged on day 1, while covering the legalities of the employment relationship.  If you need assistance developing a new hire orientation checklist, seek guidance, the last thing we want is to place a new hire in a conference room and have the individual read policies and sign paperwork alone all day.  I have been part of process like this and it does not work!

4 Updates IRS Deadline to Supply ACA Forms to Employees

In late December 2017, the IRS announced an extension for employer’s providing Affordable Care Act forms to employee’s.  As the future of the Affordable Care Act is still undecided, employers should be proactive in distributing and communicating information to the workforce.

Below are 4 updates for the ACA:

  1. Extension: The IRS extended the date to March 2, 2018 to distribute the 2017 forms to employees.  This is a 30-day extension to the regularly scheduled date of late January 2018.
  2. Penalty: “The IRS, which announced the extension December 22 in Notice 2018-06, also said it will not impose penalties on employers that can show that they made good-faith efforts to comply with the Affordable Car Act’s (ACA’s) information reporting requirements for plan year 2017.”[1]

Notice 2018-06

Information Reporting Requirements for Plan Year 2017

  1. IRS Filing Deadline: The due dates for filing 2017 returns with the IRS is not extended.  The due dates to file information returns with the IRS remain; February 28 paper filers and April 2 electronic filers.
  2. The Future and Beyond: “Although this is the third year that the IRS has granted transition relief for reporting, the notice states significantly that the IRS does not anticipate granting transition relief for 2018 or future years,” Jost pointed out. “This statement highlights the fact that, although the individual mandate penalty is repealed as of 2019, the reporting requirements that support it, as well as the employer mandate, remain in effect.”[2]

Affordable Care Act (ACA) Tax Provisions

Form 1095-B

Form 1095-C

As leader’s, we must be proactive in approaching the Affordable Care Act’s current and future legislation.  As the individual mandate penalty is repealed, the healthcare law is still the law of the land, for now.  Continue to watch for more changes in 2018 and 2019.  The ACA is complex, seek guidance if you are unclear on a path-forward.

Below is a link to the NYS Paid Family Leave Resources:

NYS Paid Family Leave Employer Webinar

PFL Resource Page

Model Language for Employer Material

[1] https://www.shrm.org/resourcesandtools/hr-topics/benefits/pages/irs-extends-aca-form-distribution-deadline.aspx

[2] https://www.shrm.org/resourcesandtools/hr-topics/benefits/pages/irs-extends-aca-form-distribution-deadline.aspx

5 Suggestions on Work-Life Balance

Many of us have vacation and time off scheduled throughout the holiday season.  Now as we enter into the mid-point of January, we strive to continue thinking about 2018 goals and objectives.  For many, finding the balance between our professional and personal commitments is an ongoing struggle. A few weeks ago, I discussed work-life balance in a leadership development training and reinforced the importance of prioritizing the balance.

Consider these 5 thoughts on work-life balance:

  1. Keep Non-Work Commitments: This is an important piece of prioritization and self-accountability.  Continue to keep non-work commitments and take the time to enjoy the events.  It is not always easy to do so.  However, it is necessary to avoid burnout from work and not enjoying friends, family, volunteering, etc.
  2. Take Vacation Time: Vacation is a perk that most organizations offer to employees.  It is there for a reason, to ensure all of us have time off and take the necessary time to refresh and reset from the stresses of work.  As leaders, we don’t always see the value in taking vacation or time off.  Set the example for your workforce and scheduled time off and avoid working during the vacation.  If possible, leave the electronics at home or avoid answering emails.  I’m the last person to give advice on this, but shutting it down is mentally refreshing.
  3. Learn to Shut It Off: This is reflecting the advice in thought #2, shut off the electronics but also shut down the thought(s) of work.  I know this isn’t easy for any of us to do. Leave work at work and focus on having fun and relaxing while you are on vacation or taking a few days off.
  4. Use Your Calendar: We all have hectic schedules, filled with meetings and commitments. Block time on your calendar to ensure you have the necessary work-life balance.  I have found in my schedule, if it is written down or on my calendar, the more likely I will commit to the balance.  Learning to prioritize plays a major role in blocking time and committing to the balance.
  5. Mental and Physical Fitness: Stress is all around us. Ensuring we are taking care of ourselves mentally and physically is necessary.  Schedule time to go to the gym, take a walk at lunch or meditate.  I workout early in the morning, I’ve found that it’s the best way to start the day.  When I don’t workout it does have an impact on my day.  Find the formula and routine that works for best for you.  Change is hard, but necessary.

As I explained to the the leadership group I met with those weeks ago; I am the last person that should be giving advice on work-life balance.  However, I recognize the importance of work-life balance and am making the necessary changes to ensure there is a balance and time to shut it down.  Commit to making the change(s) in 2018 and make it a priority.  Goal setting is a great start.  Let’s all meet our goals in 2018-one step at a time!

5 Changes to New York City Fast-Food and Retail Scheduling Laws

On Sunday, November 26, 2017, employers in New York City were required to be compliant with the new employee-scheduling laws.  The laws impact “retail” and “fast food” employers throughout the city.  These significant changes impact; breaks between shifts, predictable hours and on-call scheduling.  These laws do not impact employers in Upstate New York, however, we should be aware of any changes impacting entire industries.

Below is a summary of the 5 legal changes to the NYC fast-food and retail industries:

  1. Voluntary paycheck deductions: This new change allows fast-food employees to designate part of their salary to a non-profit organization. Employer’s must deduct from paychecks and provide the funds to the non-profit organization.
  2. Rest between shifts: This rule establishes time between shifts and bans “clopening” shifts.  When an employee works a closing shift one night and opens the next day.  The law prohibits these consecutive shifts unless there is an 11-hour break between shifts.  However, employees can agree to clopening shifts, but must be paid $100 each time.
  3. Extra hours: Employers must now post additional hours for part-time workers before hiring new workers. The communication must be posted at the worksite and sent electronically.  “Employers would only be required to offer hours to current employees up until the point at which the employer would be required to pay overtime, or until all current employees have rejected available hours, whichever comes first.”[i]
  4. Predictable scheduling: Requires employers to provide new hires an estimate of their work schedule at the start of their employment. Employers must now communicate to their existing staff their schedules 14-days in advance.  “If employees receive schedule changes with less than 14-days of notice, they must be paid a premium between $10 and $75, depending on how little notice they receive.”[ii]
  5. On-call scheduling: Prohibits certain retail businesses from requiring workers to be on- call. The new law also states that employers cannot cancel, change or add shifts with 72-hours and they must post the schedule 72-hours in advance.  There are additional exceptions for workers covered by collective bargaining agreements.

These significant legal changes are a result of the “fight for $15” movement, that we have seen in major cities across the United States.  The fight for $15 has a goal of raising minimum wage to $15 per hour and add legal protections for many low-wage earners.  If this impacts your organization, ensure you understand your obligations as an employer under the law.  Communicate and train supervisors and managers on these changes.  These are significant changes to the work relationship and will impact many organizations throughout New York City.

[i] https://www.shrm.org/resourcesandtools/legal-and-compliance/state-and-local-updates/pages/new-scheduling-laws-for-new-york-city-fast-food-and-retail-employers.aspx?_ga=2.159635643.727342918.1511008822-1767537919.1462374782

 

[ii] https://www.shrm.org/resourcesandtools/legal-and-compliance/state-and-local-updates/pages/new-scheduling-laws-for-new-york-city-fast-food-and-retail-employers.aspx?_ga=2.159635643.727342918.1511008822-1767537919.1462374782

 

4 Considerations for an I-9 Compliance Audit

With changing legislation surrounding Form I-9 compliance, organizations need to be proactive, to ensure accurate record keeping on all required documentation.  This includes auditing I-9 records every few years, to ensure all information is up-to-date and forms are correctly filled out.  The U.S. Department of Homeland Security’s Immigration and Customers Enforcement (ICE) has the legal right to review your organizations I-9 records at will.

Below are 4 considerations for an I-9 compliance audit:

  1. Fill Out All Sections Accurately: The basic information on the I-9 from should be filled out completely and accurately.  This includes; dates and names on all forms.  “A construction company was recently penalized $228,000 for multiple compliance violations…submitting I-9 forms for dozens of employees with incomplete Sections 1 and 2.”[i]  Take the time to review instructions and ensure that the employee has filled out the form properly.  If not, correct the issues.
  2. Employee Roster Information Updates: Ensure you have an accurate headcount list of current and past employees, prior to beginning an audit.  Remember, employees hired after November 6, 1986 must have an I-9 on file.  If an employee is missing an I-9, the organization must obtain one as soon as possible.
  3. I-9 Documentation: “Documentation for former employees is only needed for one year after separation or three years from date of hire (whichever is later), so no need to clutter your files with unnecessary information.”[ii] Ensure that you are obtaining the required documentation from List A or List B and List C.
  4. Necessary Signatures: This is consistent with the requirements mentioned previously.  All forms need to be signed by an employer representative and the new hire employee.  This includes remote workers.  The process isn’t complete until the forms are verified for accuracy and contain the proper information with signatures.

The SHRM article quoted throughout, contains other examples of companies that failed to complete accurately and sign the I-9 forms and the fines for these violations.  The form contains directions for both the employer and employee.  Work through the steps and ensure that the forms are accurate and up-to-date, to protect the organization from any violations and fines.  If you have questions about mistakes or conducting an audit, seek guidance and be open to suggestions.  Proactive audits necessary to ensure compliance, as the laws and forms continue to evolve.  Remember, using the new I-9 form is required now and has been in effect as of September 18, 2017.  The link to the new form and other instructional information is here: Updated Form I-9

[i] https://www.shrm.org/resourcesandtools/hr-topics/talent-acquisition/pages/prepared-for-i9-compliance-audit-ice.aspx

[ii] https://www.shrm.org/resourcesandtools/hr-topics/talent-acquisition/pages/prepared-for-i9-compliance-audit-ice.aspx

 

6 Ban the Box Laws in New York and Pennsylvania

Some employment applications ask about criminal convictions for prospective employees, either written or on the online application.  Ban the box legislation changes, have made it illegal for employers to ask prospective employees and job applicants certain questions related to criminal convictions (in certain cities and states), until the interview stage or until a conditional offer of employment is made.  The rules within the jurisdiction vary, based on location and legislative requirements.  Yes, that means more complexity related to posting positions, recruiting and interviewing in certain cities and states.  “The trend of states and municipalities enacting these so-called “ban the box” laws is part of a movement to prevent employers from treating all criminal convictions as a sort of “Scarlet Letter” that has the effect of discriminating against minority applicants.”[i]  For the purposes of this article, we will focus on New York and Pennsylvania laws.

Below are 6 ban the box laws in NY and PA:

  1. NY-Buffalo: The law impacts private employers with 15 or more employees/contractors doing business with the city.  Banning criminal history questions on the initial job applications.
  2. NY-New York City: The law impacts all employers with four or more employees. No criminal inquiries prior to the conditional job offer.
  3. NY-Rochester: The law impacts all employers with four or more employees and contractors doing business with the city. No criminal history inquiries until after the initial job interview or conditional job offer.
  4. NY-Syracuse: The law impacts city contractors. No criminal history inquiries and background checks until after the conditional job offer.
  5. PA-Philadelphia: The law impacts all employers with at least one employee in the city. No criminal background checks prior to the conditional job offer.
  6. PA-Pittsburgh: The law impacts contractors and vendors doing business with the city. Banning criminal history inquires until the applicant is deemed otherwise qualified for a position.

The laws vary in the way they are written and the legal requirements for the employer in each location.  The laws vary throughout the country, based on state or city requirements.  Some states have no ban the box requirements, currently.  As leaders, we need to understand the laws and know that a recruitment plan, job application and interview/offer process, that works in New York, might not work in California or Minnesota.  Laws continue to evolve at both the federal, state and municipal level.  These laws impact the questions we can ask and the information we can request before, during and after the job interview.  If you have questions regarding Ban the Box legislation, seek for guidance.  Changes occur quickly, and impact businesses of all sizes.

[i] SHRM Legal and Compliance Tools/Resources

New Form I-9 Issued in July 2017

It seems like we just had a new Form I-9 issued in November 2016, effective in January 2017.  We did.  The U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) published an updated version of the I-9 Form on July 17, 2017.  This new form will be mandatory to verify employment eligibility on September 18, 2017.  The revised form issued on November 14, 2016 can be used through September 17, 2017.  The current storage and retention rules remain the same.  “The new version brings very subtle changes to the form’s instructions and list of acceptable documents, which were created with the theoretical goal of making the form easier to navigate,” said Davis Bae, managing partner of the Seattle office of law firm Fisher Phillips. “Besides changing the wording on the form in almost imperceptible ways, the new version renumbers all List C documents except the Social Security card, and streamlines the certification process for certain foreign nationals.”[i]

Download the new here: Form I-9: July 17, 2017

Below are six, common I-9 Questions:

  1. Returning Summer Employees: If you rehire an employee within three years of the date that a previous Form I-9 was completed, you may either complete a new Form I-9 for your employee or complete Section 3 of the previously completed Form I-9, as long as the original I-9 shows current work authorization.”[ii]
  2. Re-verify a Female Employee Upon Getting Married: There is no requirement to re-verify a female employee or any employee who has a name change, currently.  “One other interesting point about transgender employees: The “Other Names Used field in the form has been changed to Other Last Names Used” to avoid potential discrimination issues and provide increased privacy for transgender individuals and others who have changed their first names.”[iii]
  3. Scan I-9s and Store Electronically: Due to the complexity of the rules and regulations regarding electronic scanning of I-9 Forms, the Society of Human Resource Management (SHRM) recommends using a qualified vendor to store I-9 Forms electronically.
  4. End of Retention Period: Shred I-9 Forms at the end of the required retention period.  However, verify the retention period requirements prior to shredding any documents.
  5. Completion Date of I-9 Form: The form can be completed as soon as you offer an individual the job and the job is accepted. It is best practice to have the offer and acceptance in writing.  Remind employees to bring the required documentation on the first day of work, if you do not require completion prior to the first day.
  6. Expired Driver’s License with a Receipt for Extension:  This is not legal.  “You may accept a receipt for a driver’s license that was requested to replace a license that was lost, stolen or damaged.”[iv]

We have seen multiple revisions to the I-9 Form over the past 10-months.  Remember to use the correct form on the dates required.  Switching the form now will save you time in September 2017.  Review the latest identification requirements and know what is acceptable when you are filling out the form.  Remember to fill out the form completely and ensure that the employee fills in their sections completely, signs and dates.  If you are confused seek guidance, I-9 Forms have grown in complexity and length since 1986.

 

 

Looking for more fast, up-to-date HR advice?

Check out our new podcast, Upstate HR  Recruitment in the Modern Age

Download an iTunes subscription and it will update you whenever we post a new podcast!

 – Matthew Burr, HR Consultant

[i] https://www.shrm.org/ResourcesAndTools/hr-topics/talent-acquisition/Pages/USCIS-Issues-Revised-New-Form-I9.aspx

[ii] https://www.shrm.org/resourcesandtools/legal-and-compliance/employment-law/pages/tough-i-9-issues.aspx

[iii] https://www.shrm.org/resourcesandtools/legal-and-compliance/employment-law/pages/tough-i-9-issues.aspx

[iv] https://www.shrm.org/resourcesandtools/legal-and-compliance/employment-law/pages/tough-i-9-issues.aspx

 

5 Updates on Job Description

Job descriptions are an important part of the employment relationship.  Once we complete, modify or update the job description, we might assume that the work is done.  However; essential functions, duties, technology, responsibilities, etc. can and change throughout the employment relationship.  As leaders, we need to review job descriptions and ensure these documents are up-to-date with accurate responsibilities and essential functions.  The link at the end of the article provides additional information on legal cases in which a job description protected the employer and one that harmed the employer.

Below are 5 thoughts on job descriptions:

  1. Current and Accurate: Keep all job descriptions current and accurate.  These descriptions can be reviewed during the annual review process or throughout the year.  Ask the employee for input on duties and responsibilities.  They should know the job!
  2. Essential Job Functions: Ensure that the essential job functions section is accurate and up-to-date.  Physical skills should be included in the essential functions or in another area of the job description.  Is prolonged walking or standing an essential function?  What about lifting material?  How many pounds and how often?  This should also be included in the job description.  Do not forget time spent at a desk.  If the job requires 6-8 hours on the computer, this should be included.  This section can be lengthy or detailed.
  3. FMLA Leave: “If the job description is out of date when an employee seeks FMLA leave, create a current and accurate list of essential job functions, indicate in the designation notice that the employee will be required to submit a fitness for duty certification addressing his or her ability to perform his or her specific job, and provide the list of essential job functions with the notice.”[i]
  4. Approval and Signature: My recommendation is to have more than one individual review and approve the job description prior to finalizing the draft.  There should be a signoff/approval process to ensure we have not missed anything.  Once the description is approved, the employee should review and signoff on the job description.
  5. Internet Search: It is easy to search the internet and find thousands of job descriptions.  However, this does not mean the information is legal, up-to-date or fits the job within your organization.  O’net and SHRM are great resources when drafting or updating job descriptions.  These can be used as templates and resources, to help lay the foundation of a job description that fits the needs of your organization.

As jobs and responsibilities change, so too should job descriptions.  As leaders, we should ask for input when modifying and updating job descriptions, to ensure accuracy and employee engagement.  If you are unsure on where to begin or how to draft a job description, ask for assistance.  Do not assume an internet search will provide legal and accurate information.  The case below is an example of when an inaccurate job description harmed an employer and references a case in which a job description helped an employer.

SHRM Saved – Or Sunk – By the Job Description?

 

– Matthew Burr, HR Consultant

 

[i] https://www.shrm.org/ResourcesAndTools/hr-topics/talent-acquisition/Pages/Saved-Sunk-Job-Description.aspx