10 Thoughts on Working through an ADA Accommodation

The Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) was originally published in 1991, with revisions and updates in the mid-2000’s.  The legislation prohibits discrimination against people with disabilities in the workplace.  This article will focus on disability and accommodation during the application and employment relationship.  How does this impact our organizations?  What should we consider if an applicant or employee requires reasonable accommodation?  The steps below will assist our organizations in working through the complexity of accommodations.

Below are the 10 thoughts on ADA accommodations:

  1. Are you covered by the ADA? All employers with 15 or more employees are covered under the ADA at the federal level.  Review state regulations and legislation, to verify if there are stricter requirements at the state or local level. 
  1. Policies and Procedures in Place: Ensure your organization has handbook language, a policy, process and/or procedures in place to work through disability accommodations. This includes reviewing job descriptions; physical, standing, sitting or lifting requirements.  The more accuracy in the job descriptions, the better we can assess accommodations and determine the reasonableness of the accommodation request.
  1. Is the applicant qualified? The individual needs to satisfy the definitions under the ADA.  Applicants must meet the skill, experience, education and other job-related requirements.  They must be able to perform the essential functions of the position.
  1. The Interactive Process: Employers should engage in the interactive process in which the employee, health care provider and employer share relevant and important information on the position, the disability, accommodations and limitations of the applicant. This should be a good faith communication process between the parties.
  1. Employee Disability Under the ADA:
  • The ADA defines a disability as one of the following: a) a physical or mental impairment that substantially limits a major life activity; b) a record of a physical or mental impairment that substantially limited a major life activity; or c) being regarded as having such an impairment.
  • According to the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC), the ADA Amendments Act (ADAAA) includes impairments that would automatically be considered disabilities. They include deafness, blindness, intellectual disability, completely or partially missing limbs, mobility impairments that require the use of a wheelchair, autism, cancer, cerebral palsy, diabetes, epilepsy, HIV or AIDS, multiple sclerosis and muscular dystrophy, major depression, bipolar disorder, post-traumatic stress disorder, obsessive-compulsive disorder, and schizophrenia.
  • The definition of major life activities includes caring for oneself, performing manual tasks, seeing, hearing, eating, sleeping, walking, standing, lifting, bending, speaking, breathing, learning, reading, concentrating, thinking, communicating and working. Major bodily functions include functions of the immune system; normal cell growth; and digestive, bowel, bladder, neurological, brain, respiratory, circulatory, endocrine and reproductive functions.
  • The definition of a disability also includes situations in which an employer takes an action prohibited by the ADA based on an actual or perceived impairment—for example, removing from customer contact a bank teller who has severe facial scars because customers may feel uncomfortable working with this employee or may perceive the employee as having an impairment when, in fact, he or she does not.
  • The ADAAA directs that if a “mitigating measure,” such as medication, medical equipment, devices, prosthetic limbs or low vision devices eliminates or reduces the symptoms or impact of the impairment, that fact cannot be used in determining if a person meets the definition of having a disability. Instead, the determination of disability should focus on whether the individual would be substantially limited in performing a major life activity without the mitigating measure. This rule, however, does not apply to people who wear ordinary eye glasses or contact lenses.
  • The following are not disabilities under the ADA: transvestism, transsexualism, pedophilia, exhibitionism, voyeurism, gender identity disorders not resulting from physical impairments, other sexual behavior disorders, compulsive gambling, kleptomania, pyromania, and psychoactive substance use disorders resulting from current illegal use of drugs.”[i]
  1. Reasonableness of the Accommodation: The accommodation can be a modification in the workplace. The price of reasonable accommodation will vary, case by case.  Determination of the accommodation should be an open process between the three parties and should be consistent throughout the organization with employees and applicants.
  1. Reasonable Accommodation versus Undue Hardship:
  • “The EEOC, when determining if the employee request creates an undue hardship to the employer, looks not only at the cost of the particular accommodation but also at the financial stability of a company. If the company is making significant profits or has a sizable net worth, the employer may not be able to prove that the requested accommodation would have a significant financial impact, therefore creating an undue hardship. For example, it may be an undue hardship for a nonprofit organization with limited funds to provide a special chair that costs $1,000 as an accommodation to an employee. However, the same request by an employee working in a for-profit organization that made sizable profits may not be seen as an undue hardship for that employer.
  • Accommodations that could result in an undue hardship include modifications that are “unduly extensive or disruptive, or those that would fundamentally alter the nature or operation of the job or business,” according to the EEOC. For example, small employers that require their employees to be able to perform a number of different jobs and tasks may not find it feasible or cost-effective to provide job restructuring as a “reasonable accommodation,” whereas in larger organizations, this may be a free or low-cost option.
  • The EEOC does not see impact on employee morale as a reasonable undue hardship defense.”[ii]
  1. Communication is Critical: The organization should notify the employee in writing if the accommodation has been approved or denied.  Details of the anticipated accommodation start date or reason for the denial should be included.  Copies of all material should be included in the employee files.  Make copies of all information.
  1. Review, Modify and Evolve: Just as we manage PFL and FMLA claims, we need to continue to review open accommodation cases, in the event accommodation requirements change, we need to be aware of these changes. Work with the employee and health care provider to ensure the communication channels remain open.
  1. Job Accommodation Network (JAN): “The Job Accommodation Network (JAN) is the leading source of free, expert, and confidential guidance on workplace accommodations and disability employment issues. Working toward practical solutions that benefit both employer and employee, JAN helps people with disabilities enhance their employability, and shows employers how to capitalize on the value and talent that people with disabilities add to the workplace.”[iii] This is a great resource with helpful information.  The forms, templates and accommodation recommendations are useful for all organizations.  Be proactive and strategic in your approach to accommodations.

Job Accommodation Network

Below are the links for upcoming training’s both in person and online webinars:

Upcoming Compliance Key Trainings

Elmira College: SHRM Certification Exam Prep Course- Fall 2018 & Spring 2019

Upcoming Compliance Online Training

Compliance IQ Webinar

– Matthew Burr, HR Consultant

[i] https://www.shrm.org/resourcesandtools/tools-and-samples/how-to-guides/pages/requestreasonableaccommodation.aspx

[ii] https://www.shrm.org/resourcesandtools/tools-and-samples/how-to-guides/pages/requestreasonableaccommodation.aspx

[iii] https://askjan.org/about-us/index.cfm

11 Changes to New York State Sexual Harassment Laws

Yes, that does read correctly, 11 upcoming changes.  New York State legislators have passed multiple regulations related to sexual harassment in the workplace; training, policies, reporting, etc.  Many of these new regulations and rules are in the wake of the #MeToo movement and the many issues we have seen with sexual harassment in the workplace in a variety of industries, organizations and professions.  As leader’s we cannot tolerate harassment of any kind.  The new law(s) require employers to provide sexual-harassment training to all workers and much more.

The 11 changes to sexual harassment legislation (for now):

  1. October 9, 2018: As of now, and by October 9, 2018, employers in New York State must implement annual sexual-harassment training. The state is developing a model program, which can be used by employers.  Any training implemented must meet or exceed the minimal state requirements.  More to come on this area of change.

Training Requirements:

  1. “An explanation of sexual harassment and specific examples of inappropriate conduct.
  2. Detailed information concerning federal, state and local laws and the remedies available to victims of harassment.
  3. An explanation of employees’ external rights of redress and the available administrative and judicial forums for bringing complaints.”[i]

Sexual-Harassment Prevention Policy

The state is requiring organizations to adopt a sexual-harassment prevention policy and distribute to employees (yes now you must have a handbook of sorts), the expectations of the new requirements could vary from what your organization is currently using.  The state has strict requirements for organizations policies and procedures.  Be aware of expectations and implement accordingly.  The policy is required to include (for now):

  1. “A statement prohibiting sexual harassment and providing examples of what constitutes sexual harassment.
  2. Information about federal and state sexual-harassment laws and the remedies that are available to victims—and a statement that there may be additional local laws on the matter.
  3. A standard complaint form.
  4. Procedures for a timely and confidential investigation of complaints that ensures due process for all parties.
  5. An explanation of employees’ external rights of redress and the available administrative and judicial forums for bringing complaints.
  6. A statement that sexual harassment is a form of employee misconduct and that sanctions will be enforced against those who engage in sexual harassment and against supervisors who knowingly allow such behavior to continue.
  7. A statement that it is unlawful to retaliate against employees who report sexual harassment or who testify or assist in related proceedings.”[ii]

Senate Passes Comprehensive Strengthening of New York’s Sexual Harassment Laws

The Senate Bill

Guidance on Sexual Harassment for All Employers in New York State

These changes are significant across the state.  As leaders, we need to begin planning for training needs throughout the organization and updating policies and procedures.  The training should have a sign in and sign out sheet to ensure employees did attend and stayed to complete the training.  Recording the training to verify all were in attendance was a suggestion I recently heard at a training, but to also show new employees during the new hire orientation process.  Remember this is an annual training.  However, new hires need training as well.  Policies that are modified need to have signatures and witness signatures to verify receipt and understanding.  We are all learning about these changes together.  We need to be proactive and seek guidance, as these laws continue to change and evolve.  New York City has laws above and beyond state requirements (more to be written on this).  Continue to monitor for new updates coming out of Albany.  There are many legal seminars throughout the state on this topic, which will be helpful to organizations of all sizes.  More to be written on these new requirements in upcoming articles!

 

 

– Matthew Burr, HR Consultant

[i] https://www.shrm.org/resourcesandtools/legal-and-compliance/state-and-local-updates/pages/new-york-sexual-harassment-training.aspx

[ii] https://www.shrm.org/resourcesandtools/legal-and-compliance/state-and-local-updates/pages/new-york-sexual-harassment-training.aspx

Are You Due for a Sabbatical?

Introduction Contributed by Kara Whittaker, Ghergich & Co. https://ghergich.com/   Kara@Ghergich.com

There’s a crisis in the American workplace, but it’s probably not what you think it is. We’re not taking our vacation time, and it’s leading to all sorts of unproductive, cranky, stressed-out employees. And that, we all know, isn’t good for business.
Employees not taking vacation time is not a small problem, either. In fact, the trend keeps going up—we keep taking less and less of what we’re owed—to the tune of over 660 million days left on the table, every year. If you’re one of those employees that keeps ignoring your vacation (or even if you’re not), then you might want to consider a radical approach to hitting that reset button: a sabbatical.
Many people are familiar with a sabbatical in the academic world; it’s a chance for academics to pursue a rigorous research idea and do so without having to teach class. But the same notion can be used in the workplace, even if it’s just for a few weeks or months. Here’s what to know about it – https://www.discover.com/personal-loans/resources/major-expenses/sabbatical/

you_may_be_due_for_a_sabbatical_and_not_even_know_it

Personnel Records Request in New York State & Paid Family Leave Letter Correction

Occasionally, an employee will request access to their personnel file during the employment relationship or after departing from the organization.  What are our legal obligations in providing this information to current or former employees?  There is currently, “no federal law that requires private employers to provide employees access to their personnel files, but there are many state laws that do grant access.”[i]  The answer varies, based on state specific laws and regulations.  What does that mean for employers in New York State?  Currently there is no law in New York State which permits an employee to examine his or her personnel file.  There is currently an amendment in the New York State Senate to provide public and private employees the right to review personnel files, the bill is in Committee and was proposed initially 2013-2014 and is now being proposed again in 2017-2018.  However, Pennsylvania allows an employee to inspect certain information from their own personnel files maintained by an employer.  Below are websites for New York State, Pennsylvania and the Society of Human Resources Management:

NY State Worker’s Rights Frequently Asked Questions

Senate Bill S2191: NYS Right to Review Personnel File

PA Inspection of Employment Records Law

SHRM Article: Personnel Records Access Legal Obligation Federal Laws & Policies

Again, laws vary state by state.  If you are a multi-state employer, research the specific laws and regulations and be consistent with employees.  Remember to look for (.Gov) or credible website sources, when searching for current state laws and regulations.  If you are required to provide access to employees on all or certain personnel file information, ensure you have a policy in place that is fair and consistent to all employees.

Below is a correction to the draft communication letter, when communicating NYSPFL information throughout the organization.  Correction underlined as regulation has changed, from $1.65 weekly maximum contribution to $85.56 annually:

The cost of Paid Family Leave benefits is paid for by the employee via payroll deductions.  The Company will be deducting a percentage of your average weekly wages (determined by New York State) to fund Paid Family Leave benefits.  The deduction rate, which is set by New York State and is the same for everyone, is 0.126% of each employee’s weekly wage with a weekly wage cap of $1,305.92.  The maximum contribution is currently $85.56 annually.  For example, if the employee’s weekly wage amounts to $1,000.00, the maximum payroll deduction for Paid Family Leave would be $1.26 for that week.  For employees who make more than the state’s average weekly wage of $1,305.92, the Paid Family Leave deduction will be capped at $1.65 per week (0.126% of $1,305.92).  We will be designing and communicating a more detailed Paid Family Leave policy in the future to be effective in 2018.  If you have any questions please contact ____.”

 

– Matthew Burr, HR Consultant

Burr Consulting, LLC

 

[i] https://www.shrm.org/resourcesandtools/tools-and-samples/hr-qa/pages/copypersonnelfiles.aspx

 

New York State Paid Family Leave Communication Letter

In late July, I wrote a brief article regarding “6 Need to Knows About the New York State Paid Family Leave (NYSPF) Legislation” and will more than likely write a few more articles about the legislation as we approach deadlines and implementation in 2018.  We are still patiently waiting for final rules and regulations to be issued from the New York State Workers’ Compensation Board, which continue to be communicated slowly.  Continue to monitor for any changes that can and will impact your organization.  As we approach 2018, we should begin communicating with employees about NYSPFL and the upcoming payroll deductions (if you haven’t started the deductions yet).

Below is a draft communication letter to consider when communicating NYSPFL information throughout the organization, which can also be used as a memo for a bulletin board or intranet/email message:

“Effective January 1, 2018, employees could be eligible for Paid Family Leave, as permitted under the New York Paid Family Leave Benefits Laws and Regulations.  After this date, eligible part-time and full-time employees may take Paid Family Leave under certain conditions, including: (1) to care for a family member with a serious health condition, (2) to bond with a child after birth or placement for adoption or foster care within the first 12 months after the birth or placement, or (3) because of any qualifying exigency arising from the fact that an employee’s spouse, domestic partner, child or parent is on active duty (or has been notified of an impending call or order to active duty) in the armed forces of the United States.

Paid Family Leave will phase in over 4 years with a gradually increasing benefit amount and duration, as shown below:

The cost of Paid Family Leave benefits is paid for by the employee via payroll deductions.  The Company will be deducting a percentage of your average weekly wages (determined by New York State) to fund Paid Family Leave benefits.  The deduction rate, which is set by New York State and is the same for everyone, is 0.126% of each employee’s weekly wage with a weekly wage cap of $1,305.92.  The maximum contribution is currently $1.65 each week.  For example, if the employee’s weekly wage amounts to $1,000.00, the maximum payroll deduction for Paid Family Leave would be $1.26 for that week.  For employees who make more than the state’s average weekly wage of $1,305.92, the Paid Family Leave deduction will be capped at $1.65 per week (0.126% of $1,305.92).  We will be designing and communicating a more detailed Paid Family Leave policy in the future to be effective in 2018.  If you have any questions please contact ____.”

Other considerations for NYSPFL Communication Letter and/or Policy:

  • Dates for deductions and payroll processing
  • Concurrent use with Family Medical Leave (remember FMLA varies in coverage)
  • Concurrent use of vacation and/or other paid time off
  • Eligibility, job protection and benefits protection regulations
  • Provider information, certification forms and submission processes
  • Approval and denial information

Additional organizational considerations for NYSPFL:

  • FMLA policy updates
  • Handbook updates
  • Labor and employment law posters/legal communication

The letter is designed for proactive communications.  As laws and regulations evolve, the letter/communication tools will also change.  Organizations should consider developing a frequently asked questions list, to assist employees in better understanding NYSPFL laws.  

 

– Matthew Burr, HR Consultant

8 Thoughts on Selecting an HRIS or Payroll Management System

Recently, I conducted a webinar on HRIS and Payroll Management Systems.  As leaders, we need to have a clear understanding of organizational needs for these systems.  Is the organization prepared to implement a new system or upgrade to a different system?  Are either of the systems necessary for the success of the organization?  Will it make the organization more efficient?  Are we prepared to pay for the new system?  Can we internally manage the new system?  There are many questions to consider prior to purchasing a system or buying software.

Below are 8 thoughts on selecting an HRIS or Payroll management system:

  1. Organizational assessment: Do you have the resources inhouse to select a system or should an external consultant (neutral) guide the organization through the process?
  2. Organizational needs: How would a new system work within the strategic plan of the organization?  Who is responsible for processing payroll?  Which reports do we need?  Turnover, terminations, new hires, Affirmative Action and other compliance reports.  Do we want an employee-self service module?  What about cellphone aps?  Will employees enroll in benefits on the new system?  Is it just for payroll processing?  What about all these modules?
  3. Project planning: What is the budget for the new system?  Do we have IT support to manage the new system?  Do we have server space for the new system?  Do we have the time to invest in project planning and project implementation?  As we approach the fall months, open enrollment, holidays and performance reviews will take priority.  Time is important for the success of a major implementation.
  4. Evaluating available systems: Develop a spreadsheet that ranks and rates the available system, based on the needs assessment.  What does the organization need and how will we measure available systems?
  5. Project team: “Critical stakeholders may differ from organization to organization, but the considerations and evaluation committee should at least include members from the following departments: IT, payroll/finance/accounting, HR, compensation, performance management, training, recruiting, operations.”[i] Operations is a major stakeholder in the selection process.  Supervisors, managers and employees will be inputting and approving timesheets.  They need to be included in the selection process.  Slow and inefficient systems take away from operations.
  6. Requesting the proposals: Utilize the RFP process within your organization and seek four to seven bids from vendors.  Include information about the organization, project specifications (organizational needs), high-level budget information and project schedule/implementation dates.  Ensure you leave enough time to evaluate systems, 3-6-month commitments on current pricing schedule.
  7. Trial the systems: The project team should meet with three to four potential vendors.   A demonstration of the systems should be included in the evaluation.  Utilize the evaluation spreadsheet that was developed and be prepared to ask questions.  The entire team should be present during the demonstrations and evaluation discussions.
  8. Make your choice: Upon selecting one or two final systems, a request should be made to each vendor for references and potential onsite visits.  The vendors should provide current or past clients.  If they avoid providing references, this might a red flag during the selection process.

Once the finalist has been selected, the organization should negotiate a service contract.  Other negotiation considerations; training, IT support, cloud support, compliance updates, software updates, warranties, self-service, cellphone aps and modules.  Does the organization need a system with all the bells and whistles?  Ensure that you are not upsold on modules and system add-ons you do not need or will not use.  Hold the vendor accountable to the agreed upon service contract.  If you are unclear on the process seek guidance and welcome advice.

 

– Matthew Burr, HR Consultant

Burr Consulting, LLC

 

[i] https://www.shrm.org/resourcesandtools/tools-and-samples/how-to-guides/pages/howtoselectanhrissystem.aspx

6 Need to Knows About New York State Paid Family Leave

I have written about New York State Paid Family Leave three or four times over the past 8 months, and will more than likely write a few more articles about the legislation as we approach deadlines and implementation in 2018.  We are still patiently waiting for final rules and regulations to be issued from the New York State Workers’ Compensation Board, which continue to be communicated slowly to employers and insurance companies.  Continue to monitor for any changes that can and will impact your organization.

Below are 6 Need to Knows about NYSPFL as we approach 1/1/2018:

  1. Employer Eligibility: Qualifying reasons for leave under current PFL include; bonding with a new child (birth, adoption or placement in foster care), employee providing care for a child, parent, grandparent, grandchild, spouse or domestic partner with a serious health condition and qualifying exigencies arising from military services of the employee’s spouse, domestic partner, child, or parent.  Serious health condition or qualifying exigencies, follow the same guidelines that we see under the Family Medical Leave Act (FMLA)
  2. New York State’s Average Weekly Wage: The current average weekly wage is $1,305.92.  On March 31st of each calendar year, the rate is recalculated by the New York State Department of Labor.  More than likely, we will see this rate continue to increase year over year.
  3. Employer’s Obligation to Fund Paid Family Leave: “Although employers are required to provide PFL benefits to eligible employees, employers are not required to pay anything towards the cost of those benefits. Paid family leave is intended to be 100% employee-funded.”[i]  The Worker’s Compensation Board has yes to publish all rules in this area, continue to monitor for additional updates and new guidelines.
  4. Maximum Deductions: The most that can be deducted is 0.126% of the New York State average weekly wage.  This will be for an employee’s weekly wage.
  5. Insurance or Self-Insure: The employer can forego obtaining insurance and has the option to self-insure. Currently, the employer must elect to do so and file the required paperwork with New York State, no later than September 30, 2017.
  6. Employer’s Offering Benefits That Exceed NYSPFL: If an employer is already offering paid family leave that exceed the legal requirements and pay full salary during leave, the employer may request reimbursement from the insurance carrier for advance payment of benefits.  The employee is not entitled to add-on or double dip NYSPFL or short-term disability.  Benefits are limited to a total of 26-weeks; paid family leave and disability.   

 

As we approach January 1, 2018, continue to watch for updated rules and regulations from the New York State Worker’s Compensation Board.  There are still unanswered questions and areas of the legislation that need to be clarified.  Organizations should now be working with insurance companies or determining if they would like to be self-insured.  Do not wait until the last minute to begin implementing, taking deductions or communicating with the workforce.  The law is complex, seek guidance if you are confused.

New York State Paid Family Leave Resource Website

FMLA & NYPFL – Key Differences

PFLvsFMLA

[ii]

– Matthew Burr, HR Consultant

[i] https://www.bsk.com/media-center/3746-labor-employment-faqs-mdash-things-you-want-and-need-know-about#.WWfMyYVh068.linkedin

 

[ii] Guardian NYSPFL Presentation

4 Updates on the DOL Overtime Rule

I first want to highlight the background of the overtime rule, from 2016 through current day.  In November 2016, a district court in Texas blocked the overtime rule put forth under the Obama administration.  It was scheduled to raise the salary threshold from $23,600 to $47,476 on December 1, 2016.  Moving to current day, under the Trump administration, the decision was appealed, to better understand and determine the Department of Labor’s authority in setting salary thresholds.  The 2016 ruling is currently moving (slowly) through the litigation process.  However, the Department of Labor has suggested new and more complex alternatives to the salary threshold and overtime rule(s).

Below 4 on the DOL’s Overtime Suggestions:

  1. Request for Information: On July 26, 2017, the Department of Labor issued a request for information (RFI) during the overtime rule making process.  “The use of an RFI in the rule making process is optional but the DOL chose this option rather than immediately publishing a proposed rule in light of pending litigation over the 2016 overtime rule.”[i]  The RFI was published in the Federal Register and comments will be public record.

https://s3.amazonaws.com/public-inspection.federalregister.gov/2017-15666.pdf

  1. Cost-of-Living-Based Salary Test: This is comparable to what we have seen with minimum wage levels and exempt/non-exempt weekly rates, throughout New York City and New York State.  The suggested rates would vary based location and cost of living, a varying scale of exempt and non-exempt rates.  Living in Washington D.C. costs more than living in the rural south.  There will be significant challenges with this option, employees that travel, working in more than one location in different areas of the country.
  2. Litigation and Other Threshold Proposals: Continue to watch for any rulings in the current court proceedings on the Department of Labor’s authority in setting salary thresholds. Also, we could see multiple proposals throughout this process on overtime and salary thresholds, under the new administration.
  3. New York State Regulations: Regardless of changes made at the federal level, we will see changes in the minimum wage rate and exempt/non-exempt rates on January 1, 2018.  Exempt and non-exempt for the specific executive and administrative classifications.  Both increases/changes will vary by region, throughout the state.

 

The laws, regulations and salary thresholds will continue to evolve, through the litigation process by the Department of Labor, request for information proposal and rule making process under the new administration.  Ensure that your organization is compliant with state and federal laws regarding exempt, non-exempt and salaried non-exempt statuses.  There are duties tests to assist employers in determining overtime eligibility, published by the federal government.  If you are confused, seek guidance.  Certain positions can be confusing and determinations are complex.

 

 

– Matthew Burr, HR Consultant

 

 

[i] https://www.shrm.org/resourcesandtools/legal-and-compliance/employment-law/pages/ot-rfi-multiple-salary-levels.aspx

 

25 State Specific Labor Poster Changes

In February, I wrote a brief article regarding the six changes to the federal labor law poster penalties.  The fines associated with these changes and non-compliance (or not updating) with current labor poster regulations did increase.

Labor and employment regulations on these posters at both the federal and state level can and have changed during the year.  They do not always change at the end of or beginning of a calendar year.  As leaders, we need ensure these posters are updated timely with accurate information.  There are times when posting requirements will not change from year to year.  However, the changes we have seen over the past 2-3 years are significant.  Below are 25 state specific labor poster changes to be aware of in 2017:

25 Poster Changes in 2017.jpg

[i]

New York State minimum wage increased at the end of 2016 and will increase again at the end of 2017.  Remember that NYS Paid Family Leave might also be added to the posting requirements in 2018.  Many of our organizations operate in multiple states.  We need to ensure the labor posters are updated with accurate federal and state information.  An updated poster in New York State does not guarantee that the information in any other state of operation is up-to-date.  Review posters in all locations to ensure legal compliance.  Certain payroll companies will provide updated posters, based on the agreed upon contract.  There are services organizations can subscribe, to receive the updated posters when changes are made on the federal, state or local level.  If you are unsure on the legality of your organizations posters, seek guidance.  Do not assume it is up-to-date.  Buying a poster (or downloading the information for free) is much cheaper than paying a fine.  Audits and reviews are always helpful in understanding what changes need to be made!  The website below provides more information on state specific mandatory updates:

Posterupdates.com

 

– Matthew Burr, HR Consultant

 

[i] SHRM.org

New Form I-9 Issued in July 2017

It seems like we just had a new Form I-9 issued in November 2016, effective in January 2017.  We did.  The U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) published an updated version of the I-9 Form on July 17, 2017.  This new form will be mandatory to verify employment eligibility on September 18, 2017.  The revised form issued on November 14, 2016 can be used through September 17, 2017.  The current storage and retention rules remain the same.  “The new version brings very subtle changes to the form’s instructions and list of acceptable documents, which were created with the theoretical goal of making the form easier to navigate,” said Davis Bae, managing partner of the Seattle office of law firm Fisher Phillips. “Besides changing the wording on the form in almost imperceptible ways, the new version renumbers all List C documents except the Social Security card, and streamlines the certification process for certain foreign nationals.”[i]

Download the new here: Form I-9: July 17, 2017

Below are six, common I-9 Questions:

  1. Returning Summer Employees: If you rehire an employee within three years of the date that a previous Form I-9 was completed, you may either complete a new Form I-9 for your employee or complete Section 3 of the previously completed Form I-9, as long as the original I-9 shows current work authorization.”[ii]
  2. Re-verify a Female Employee Upon Getting Married: There is no requirement to re-verify a female employee or any employee who has a name change, currently.  “One other interesting point about transgender employees: The “Other Names Used field in the form has been changed to Other Last Names Used” to avoid potential discrimination issues and provide increased privacy for transgender individuals and others who have changed their first names.”[iii]
  3. Scan I-9s and Store Electronically: Due to the complexity of the rules and regulations regarding electronic scanning of I-9 Forms, the Society of Human Resource Management (SHRM) recommends using a qualified vendor to store I-9 Forms electronically.
  4. End of Retention Period: Shred I-9 Forms at the end of the required retention period.  However, verify the retention period requirements prior to shredding any documents.
  5. Completion Date of I-9 Form: The form can be completed as soon as you offer an individual the job and the job is accepted. It is best practice to have the offer and acceptance in writing.  Remind employees to bring the required documentation on the first day of work, if you do not require completion prior to the first day.
  6. Expired Driver’s License with a Receipt for Extension:  This is not legal.  “You may accept a receipt for a driver’s license that was requested to replace a license that was lost, stolen or damaged.”[iv]

We have seen multiple revisions to the I-9 Form over the past 10-months.  Remember to use the correct form on the dates required.  Switching the form now will save you time in September 2017.  Review the latest identification requirements and know what is acceptable when you are filling out the form.  Remember to fill out the form completely and ensure that the employee fills in their sections completely, signs and dates.  If you are confused seek guidance, I-9 Forms have grown in complexity and length since 1986.

 

 

Looking for more fast, up-to-date HR advice?

Check out our new podcast, Upstate HR  Recruitment in the Modern Age

Download an iTunes subscription and it will update you whenever we post a new podcast!

 – Matthew Burr, HR Consultant

[i] https://www.shrm.org/ResourcesAndTools/hr-topics/talent-acquisition/Pages/USCIS-Issues-Revised-New-Form-I9.aspx

[ii] https://www.shrm.org/resourcesandtools/legal-and-compliance/employment-law/pages/tough-i-9-issues.aspx

[iii] https://www.shrm.org/resourcesandtools/legal-and-compliance/employment-law/pages/tough-i-9-issues.aspx

[iv] https://www.shrm.org/resourcesandtools/legal-and-compliance/employment-law/pages/tough-i-9-issues.aspx