2018 W-4 Form, W-4 Requirements Annually, and changes to NYC Legislation

In late February, the IRS released the updated 2018 Form W-4 and an updated tax withholding calculator.  The calculator provides an opportunity for employees to check their 2018 tax withholding after the passage of the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act, prior to filling out a new Form W-4.

2018 Form W-4

IRS Withholding Calculator

Do employee’s need to complete a new Form W-4 annually:

“Not necessarily. A W-4 form remains in effect until an employee submits a new one except when an employee claims to be exempt from income tax withholding.”

Employers should ensure they have new W-4s for:

  1. New employees. Employers should keep copies of the most current W-4s on hand.
  2. Employees who had a change in withholding events during the year.
  3. Employees claiming exemption from withholding. To continue to be exempt from withholding in the next year, employees must give employers a new W-4 claiming exempt status by Feb. 15 of that year. If an employee doesn’t give you a new Form W-4, employers must withhold tax based on the last valid Form W-4 for the employee that doesn’t claim exemption from withholding or, if one doesn’t exist, as if he or she is single with zero withholding allowances.”[i]

 

IRS Publication 15 provides guidelines for employers to remind employees before December 1 of each year to submit a new W-4 form if the withholding allowances changed or will be changing in the next year; due to added dependents, new tax legislation, etc.  As employers, we need to ensure all of our new hire paperwork is up-to-date.  This recent change should be noted as part of your organizations onboarding/new hire process.

 

NYC Evolving Legislative Changes:

NYC Mandates Temporary Schedule Changes 7/18/18

The new law provides employees with additional rights to demand changes to their schedule.  The law permits employees to demand two temporary schedule changes per calendar year for personal events.  The definition of personal events is broad, which leaves room for interpretation.  There are guidelines and certain exemptions to the new rule.  However, it is broad and will cover many organizations.

NYC Mandates “Cooperative Dialogue” 10/15/2018

This law codifies the organizations obligation to engage in a cooperative dialogue with any employee who may be entitled to reasonable accommodation.  “Specifically, you will need to engage in a good faith written or oral “cooperative dialogue” with the employee addressing:

  1. The employee’s accommodation needs.
  2. Potential accommodations that may address the needs, including alternatives to an employee’s requested accommodation.
  3. The difficulties that such potential accommodations may pose for your business.

After a final determination is made at the conclusion of the “cooperative dialogue,” you must provide the employee requesting the accommodation with a final written determination as to whether or not the accommodation is granted.”[v]

The  legislative changes in New York City will not impact employers in the Southern Tier, unless you have employees in the city.  However, as we have seen in the past, changes in NYC make their way to Albany, which result in statewide sweeping legislative changes, which can and do impact organizations in the Southern Tier.  Continue to watch for legal updates at the federal, state and local level.  If you are confused, seek guidance.  Legislative change is a continuous process and it can be complex.  As society evolves, so do our laws and regulations.  Asking questions, attending trainings, working with consultants and attorneys will provide you with a clearer picture of the evolving legislation.

Interested in learning more from me? Check out the options shared here: 

Upcoming Compliance Key Trainings

Elmira College: SHRM Certification Exam Prep Course- Coming in Spring 2019

Upcoming Corning Community College Training’s

[i] https://www.shrm.org/resourcesandtools/tools-and-samples/hr-qa/pages/cms_015244.aspx

[ii] https://www.shrm.org/resourcesandtools/hr-topics/compensation/pages/daylight-saving-time-wage-hour-problems.aspx

[iii] https://www.shrm.org/resourcesandtools/hr-topics/compensation/pages/daylight-saving-time-wage-hour-problems.aspx

[iv] Burr Consulting, LLC, “3 Daylight Savings Time Wage & Hour Considerations”, Burrconsultingllc.com, November 6, 2017

[v] https://www.shrm.org/resourcesandtools/legal-and-compliance/state-and-local-updates/pages/new-york-city-employers-reasonable-accommodations.aspx

-Matthew W. Burr

3 Thoughts on What Should and Should Not Be Included in the Personnel Files

In a March 2015 article written by the Society of Human Resource Management, the article provided guidance on separating employee files for relevancy and confidentiality.  Employee records can be separated into three types of files.  “A general personnel file, a confidential employee file and a common file.”[i]  Organizations should always consider and be aware of sensitive information (date of birth, marital status, Social Security numbers, HIPAA protected information, criminal history, court orders, financial history, etc.), that can be included in any of the three separated files.  Other considerations should include relevancy to the supervisor or management of the workforce.  “Is it related to the employee’s performance, knowledge skills, abilities or behavior?”[ii]  This should also be a determining factor, when separating information and organizing new files.  Does the supervisor or manager need access to all the information?

The Basic Personnel File (supervisor and manager relevant):

  • Recruiting information, resumes, job application and academic transcripts
  • Job descriptions (signed)
  • Job offer, promotion, rates of pay, compensation information, training records
  • Handbook and policy acknowledgements (including revised policies)
  • Recognition
  • Disciplinary information, warnings, coaching and counseling
  • Performance evaluations
  • Termination records, exit interview, closure of the file (goes without writing)

The Confidential Personnel File:

  • EEO records
  • Reference and background checks
  • Drug test results
  • Medical and insurance records
  • Child support and garnishments
  • Legal documents
  • Workers compensation and short-term disability claims
  • Investigation notes
  • Form I-9*

The Common File:

  • Form I-9 Audits
  • Form I-9’s* (my recommendation is to put active employee’s I-9’s in a binder that is accessible, confidential and locked in a cabinet, for auditing and reviews).

Regardless of the filing process(s) your organization has implemented, the information contained in any of the employee files needs to be kept confidential and locked in secure filing cabinets.  During trainings with supervisors and managers, my statement is simple, treat your employee’s information as it is your own confidential information.  The last thing we want is open personnel files on desks, doctor’s notes attached to calendars and unlocked filing cabinets.  When an employee exits the organization, I consolidate all files and information into one folder and store in a terminated employee file section, with the exit interview (if applicable).  “Maintaining records in separate files as discussed above allows managers, employees and outside auditors to see the information they need to make decisions, yet does not allow inappropriate access.”[iii]  Filing and organizing paperwork is not always fun, but it is necessary to ensure legality and confidentiality.  If you are confused on employee files and appropriate storage, seek guidance.  Electronic files and legal requirements related to electronic filing can vary by state, a thorough understanding of these laws is necessary prior to implementing an electronic filing system.  We should be proactive and take all precautions, related to employee records and record retention.

[iv]

[i] https://www.shrm.org/resourcesandtools/tools-and-samples/hr-qa/pages/includedinpersonnelfile.aspx

[ii] https://www.shrm.org/resourcesandtools/tools-and-samples/hr-qa/pages/includedinpersonnelfile.aspx

[iii] https://www.shrm.org/resourcesandtools/tools-and-samples/hr-qa/pages/includedinpersonnelfile.aspx

[iv] http://cyquesthr.com/access-personnel-files-laws-50-states/

4 EEOC Guidelines on Workplace Harassment Prevention and Cadillac Healthcare Tax Updates

The U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission recently released the “Promising Practices for Preventing Harassment.”  This is a guidance document for employers, that contains harassment prevention recommendations for all employers in four categories.  As leaders we have a responsibility to take all harassment claims serious and need to ensure a proactive approach to investigations, communication and accountability as it related to workplace harassment claims, sexual harassment, retaliation, bullying, workplace violence concerns, etc.

The Four Categories:

  1. Leadership and Accountability: “The cornerstone of a successful harassment prevention strategy is the consistent and demonstrated commitment of senior leaders to create and maintain a culture in which harassment is not tolerated.”[i]
  2. Comprehensive and Effective Harassment Policy: “A comprehensive, clear harassment policy that is regularly communicated to all employees is an essential element of an effective harassment prevention strategy.”[ii]
  3. Effective and Accessible Harassment Complaint System: “An effective harassment complaint system welcomes questions, concerns, and complaints; encourages employees to report potentially problematic conduct early; treats alleged victims, complainants, witnesses, alleged harassers, and others with respect; operates promptly, thoroughly, and impartially; and imposes appropriate consequences for harassment or related misconduct, such as retaliation.”[iii]
  4. Effective Harassment Training: “Leadership, accountability, and strong harassment policies and complaint systems are essential components of a successful harassment prevention strategy, but only if employees are aware of them. Regular, interactive, comprehensive training of all employees may help ensure that the workforce understands organizational rules, policies, procedures, and expectations, as well as the consequences of misconduct.”[iv]

For additional information on the Promising Practices for Preventing Harassment guidance (each of the four have additional recommendations on the website) for your organization and workforce, the link is below:

Promising Practices for Preventing Harassment

Cadillac Tax Updates

Congress passed a law on January 22 to delay the affordable Car Act’s 40 percent excise tax on high-value healthcare plan for two years.  The Cadillac tax was set to take effect in 2020, under the new law, the tax will be delayed until 2022.

What to expect in 2022:

  • $10,200 for individual coverage ($11,850 for qualified retirees and those in high-risk professions).
  • $27,500 for family coverage ($30,950 for qualified retirees and those in high-risk professions).[v]

Under the new administration we could see significant changes to the Affordable Care Act and healthcare in general.  Continue to monitor for updates and changes, that can and will impact your workforce.  If you are confused seek guidance, healthcare law continues to evolve in complexity at the federal and state levels.

[i] https://www.eeoc.gov/eeoc/publications/promising-practices.cfm

[ii] https://www.eeoc.gov/eeoc/publications/promising-practices.cfm

[iii] https://www.eeoc.gov/eeoc/publications/promising-practices.cfm

[iv] https://www.eeoc.gov/eeoc/publications/promising-practices.cfm

[v] https://www.shrm.org/resourcesandtools/hr-topics/benefits/pages/congress-delays-cadillac-tax-until-2022.aspx