4 Considerations for an I-9 Compliance Audit

With changing legislation surrounding Form I-9 compliance, organizations need to be proactive, to ensure accurate record keeping on all required documentation.  This includes auditing I-9 records every few years, to ensure all information is up-to-date and forms are correctly filled out.  The U.S. Department of Homeland Security’s Immigration and Customers Enforcement (ICE) has the legal right to review your organizations I-9 records at will.

Below are 4 considerations for an I-9 compliance audit:

  1. Fill Out All Sections Accurately: The basic information on the I-9 from should be filled out completely and accurately.  This includes; dates and names on all forms.  “A construction company was recently penalized $228,000 for multiple compliance violations…submitting I-9 forms for dozens of employees with incomplete Sections 1 and 2.”[i]  Take the time to review instructions and ensure that the employee has filled out the form properly.  If not, correct the issues.
  2. Employee Roster Information Updates: Ensure you have an accurate headcount list of current and past employees, prior to beginning an audit.  Remember, employees hired after November 6, 1986 must have an I-9 on file.  If an employee is missing an I-9, the organization must obtain one as soon as possible.
  3. I-9 Documentation: “Documentation for former employees is only needed for one year after separation or three years from date of hire (whichever is later), so no need to clutter your files with unnecessary information.”[ii] Ensure that you are obtaining the required documentation from List A or List B and List C.
  4. Necessary Signatures: This is consistent with the requirements mentioned previously.  All forms need to be signed by an employer representative and the new hire employee.  This includes remote workers.  The process isn’t complete until the forms are verified for accuracy and contain the proper information with signatures.

The SHRM article quoted throughout, contains other examples of companies that failed to complete accurately and sign the I-9 forms and the fines for these violations.  The form contains directions for both the employer and employee.  Work through the steps and ensure that the forms are accurate and up-to-date, to protect the organization from any violations and fines.  If you have questions about mistakes or conducting an audit, seek guidance and be open to suggestions.  Proactive audits necessary to ensure compliance, as the laws and forms continue to evolve.  Remember, using the new I-9 form is required now and has been in effect as of September 18, 2017.  The link to the new form and other instructional information is here: Updated Form I-9

[i] https://www.shrm.org/resourcesandtools/hr-topics/talent-acquisition/pages/prepared-for-i9-compliance-audit-ice.aspx

[ii] https://www.shrm.org/resourcesandtools/hr-topics/talent-acquisition/pages/prepared-for-i9-compliance-audit-ice.aspx

 

6 Ban the Box Laws in New York and Pennsylvania

Some employment applications ask about criminal convictions for prospective employees, either written or on the online application.  Ban the box legislation changes, have made it illegal for employers to ask prospective employees and job applicants certain questions related to criminal convictions (in certain cities and states), until the interview stage or until a conditional offer of employment is made.  The rules within the jurisdiction vary, based on location and legislative requirements.  Yes, that means more complexity related to posting positions, recruiting and interviewing in certain cities and states.  “The trend of states and municipalities enacting these so-called “ban the box” laws is part of a movement to prevent employers from treating all criminal convictions as a sort of “Scarlet Letter” that has the effect of discriminating against minority applicants.”[i]  For the purposes of this article, we will focus on New York and Pennsylvania laws.

Below are 6 ban the box laws in NY and PA:

  1. NY-Buffalo: The law impacts private employers with 15 or more employees/contractors doing business with the city.  Banning criminal history questions on the initial job applications.
  2. NY-New York City: The law impacts all employers with four or more employees. No criminal inquiries prior to the conditional job offer.
  3. NY-Rochester: The law impacts all employers with four or more employees and contractors doing business with the city. No criminal history inquiries until after the initial job interview or conditional job offer.
  4. NY-Syracuse: The law impacts city contractors. No criminal history inquiries and background checks until after the conditional job offer.
  5. PA-Philadelphia: The law impacts all employers with at least one employee in the city. No criminal background checks prior to the conditional job offer.
  6. PA-Pittsburgh: The law impacts contractors and vendors doing business with the city. Banning criminal history inquires until the applicant is deemed otherwise qualified for a position.

The laws vary in the way they are written and the legal requirements for the employer in each location.  The laws vary throughout the country, based on state or city requirements.  Some states have no ban the box requirements, currently.  As leaders, we need to understand the laws and know that a recruitment plan, job application and interview/offer process, that works in New York, might not work in California or Minnesota.  Laws continue to evolve at both the federal, state and municipal level.  These laws impact the questions we can ask and the information we can request before, during and after the job interview.  If you have questions regarding Ban the Box legislation, seek for guidance.  Changes occur quickly, and impact businesses of all sizes.

[i] SHRM Legal and Compliance Tools/Resources

4 Tips Complying with State and Federal Workplace Safety Standards

Workplace safety rules and regulations continue to evolve at the federal and state level, just as labor and employment laws and regulations have.  As I have recently started revising a safety manual for a client, I now have a profound respect for workplace safety professionals.  Because laws and regulations do vary at both the federal and state level, we as leaders need to be aware of changes in legislation, that can and will impact our organizations.

Below are 4 tips on complying with state and federal workplace safety standards:

  1. Federal OSH Act: Passed in 1970, “covers most private employers and their workers. However, OSHA allows states to develop their own workplace health and safety plans, as long as those plans are “at least as effective” as the federal program.”[i]
  2. Multi-State Employers: Currently, twenty-one states and Puerto Rico have OSHA-approved plans that cover government employees at the state and local level, as well as private employers. Five other states and the U.S. Virgin Islands currently have plans that cover only state and local government employers.
  3. State Laws: States can have laws more stringent than the federal requirements and/or standards that are not addressed by federal OSHA. This is comparable to HR laws and regulations; minimum wage, paid family leave, exempt/non-exempt status, background checks, etc.  Review state and local requirements, as well as OSHA approved state plans.
  4. Compliance: Employers should review the federal requirements to ensure compliance and then review state compliance standards. “”Stay on top of the state plan regulations,” Martin said. “Assuming the state plan has the same regulations as federal OSHA may be a safe bet 80 percent of the time, but the differences can burn you.””[ii]

For Additional Information: OSHA State Plans Website

As we have seen under the current administration, laws and regulations continue to change.  This will have an impact on OSHA standards at the federal level.  Under the Obama administration, a law was passed that required certain employers to submit workplace injury and illness records through a portal on the OSHA website in July 2017.  The Trump administration pushed compliance back to December 1, 2017, to evaluate the rule and requirements.  Regardless, the electronic record keeping requirement can still be implemented at a state level, in certain states.  Be aware of these changes and recognize the impact they can and will have on your organization.  If you have questions, continue to seek guidance.

[i] https://www.shrm.org/resourcesandtools/legal-and-compliance/employment-law/pages/state-workplace-safety-standards-may-differ-from-osha.aspx

[ii] https://www.shrm.org/resourcesandtools/legal-and-compliance/employment-law/pages/state-workplace-safety-standards-may-differ-from-osha.aspx

 

5 Steps for a Successful Open Enrollment Period

During the months of October and November, employers annually conduct open enrollment sessions for employees and family members. These informational sessions, communicate upcoming benefit changes, new costs and any other relevant information that will impact the employee or employees family. The open enrollment sessions also provide an opportunity for the employee and/or significant other to ask questions regarding benefits and costs. SHRM published, “6 Simple Ways to Improve Open Enrollment,” in August 2017. Additional information or resource material, will be helpful to us as leaders and to our employees who need the information to make the best decision for themselves and their families, related to benefits.
Below are 5 steps for a successful open enrollment period:

1. Prepare, Prepare, Prepare: Generate and disseminate information prior to open enrollment meetings. This will provide employees with the opportunity to review the information prior to the open enrollment sessions. Ensure that the information is communicated through the proper organizational channels and it is easy to understand. Do not make benefit information over complex or complicated. Develop a frequently asked questions sheet that will provide assistance to employees when thinking about questions and possible solutions. We cannot cover every questions, this format will help generate thought and answers.

2. Focus on the Employees: This step encompasses step #1, in that we need to prepare information for the workforce that is relevant and timely. Knowing your employees will add value to focusing on specific tools and resources for the open enrollment process.

3. Identify Needs: “Review the results of previous years’ open enrollment efforts to make sure the process and the perks remain relevant and useful to workers.” Do you send out a survey asking for feedback from last year’s open enrollment? What are the demographics of the workforce? Do you have metrics associated with benefit usage?

4. All Available Resources: Are we utilizing all the available resources inside and outside of the organization? Is the marketing department to develop material and communications? Are we partnering with brokers, insurance carrier and vendors to provide sufficient resources during the open enrollment process? Are we communicating all information? Remember NYS Paid Family Leave. Be creative. If you were in the employee’s shoes, what resources would add value and engagement throughout the enrollment process? Don’t assume that the carrier will say no, if you never ask, you will not know the answer.

5. Spouses Involvement: Many organizations provide the opportunity for spouses and domestic partners to be involved in the open enrollment process. Meeting times might need to be changed from day to night or weekend sessions. Other options could be webinars or one-on-one meetings. Involving the spouse will generate more questions and continued engagement.

Open enrollment can be a complex and confusing process for any employee. As leadership, we need to be aware of the needs of our workforce and find proactive solutions to manage and communicate these complexities. “Benefits enrollment strategies are always evolving. What worked last year may not be relevant this year. But you can’t go wrong putting employee’s needs first.” If it was you, what questions would you have during open enrollment?

– Matthew Burr, HR Consultant

Matthew@Burrconultingllc.com

Burr Consulting, LLC

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